CONSERVATION

Riverfly monitoring on the Ogmore. Photo by Goldhead

Riverfly monitoring on the Ogmore. Photo by Goldhead

 

 

About our conservation work -

The Ogmore Angling Association is actively supporting measures to improve and protect the quality of the rivers which it controls in a number of ways.


Pollution control. Anglers are the front line of water quality monitoring and club members will generally be the first to identify and report pollution to the Environment Agency. OgmoreAngling Association members have significantly reduced the impact of pollution to the River Ogmore on numerous occasions and their presence on the river acts as a deterrent to would-be polluters. 

OAA members riverfly monitoring on the Ogmore. Photos - Goldhead


Invertebrate monitoring. OAA has embarked on a project with the Riverfly Partnership to collect, identify and record the aquatic invertebrates in our local watercourses which indicate whether the quality of the water is in good order. Pollution and polluters can be detected by this method and the club is working with neighbouring angling clubs to safeguard the ecological status of the Ogmore river system. Contact Ian Finylas if you would like to join the team.
Reducing exploitation. The club supports the voluntary catch and release of fish which means both migratory and resident species are increasingly frequently being returned to the river after capture, enabling them to complete their marvellous life cycle.

 

Photo - Andrew Davies


Bailiffing.
Poachers are a perennial threat to the life that abounds in the Ogmore. Poaching methods are cruel and destructive, threatening the birds, mammals, invertebrates and fish that populate the river and its environs. Netting and poisoning, the favourite methods employed by poachers, kill indiscriminately and  club members are ever-alert to this threat to the enjoyment of their sport. Unregulated anglers are the individuals which give our sport a bad name, they have no respect for the river and are usually to blame for discarding used line and littering the river bank. Club members are vigilant in their reporting of poaching events and the club is fortunate to have voluntary bailiffs who are diligent in detecting, and dealing with poaching along the Ogmore.


River clean-ups. The club organises regular litter picking events to maintain an attractive and safe river bank for all to enjoy. If you’d like to be involved please contact Geraint Jones who coordinates the club’s work in this area.
Stock enhancement. Ever keen to enhance the head of fish in the River, the  Ogmore Angling Association independently funds a programme of restocking the river using native fish which are returned to the river after their eggs and milt have been harvested. The resulting fertilised eggs are kept  at a hatchery and the young fish are fed and  protected from their natural predators in large tanks until they are of a sufficient size to be reintroduced to the river in sustainable numbers.

 

Regulation. Club rules limit members to more stringent angling practices and fishing seasons than those which the regulatory authorities require. Codes of conduct are also defined in the rules which ensure that club members not only fish in a responsible manner but also behave responsibly while they’re fishing.

 

Reducing exploitation. The club supports the voluntary catch and release of fish which means both migratory and resident species are being returned to the river after capture with increasing frequency, enabling them to complete their marvellous life cycle.

 

A sewin being returned to the Ogmore to complete its journey from the sea back up river to the spawning streams. Only a small percentage of fish which are released fail to survive and with proper handling almost 100% will survive.

A sewin being returned to the River Ogmore. Photo - Ian Finylas